Name ship: ACHILLES

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Identification Data

Year built: 1866
Classification Register:
IMO number:
Nat. Official Number:
Category: Cargo vessel
Propulsion: Steamship
Type: General Cargo
Standard Ship Type:
Type Deck:
Masts:
Rig:
Lift Capacity:
Material Hull:
Decks: 2
Construction Data

Shipbuilder: Scott & Co., Greenock, Great Britain
Yardnumber:
Date Laid Down:
Launch Date: 1866-04-18
Delivery Date: 1866-09-01
Technical Data

Engine Manufacturer: Greenock Foundry Company, Greenock, Great Britain
Engine Type: Steam, Compound
Number of Cylinders: 2
Power: 945
Power Unit: IHP (IPK)
Eng. additional info: 710 & 1420-1320
Speed in knots: 10.00
Number of screws: 1
 
Gross Tonnage: 2362.00 Gross tonnage
Net Tonnage: 1488.00 Net tonnage
Deadweight:
 
Length 1: 94.31 Meters Length overall (Loa)
Beam: 11.78 Meters Registered
Depth: 8.63 Meters Registered
Draught:
 
Passengers:
1st 2nd 3rd Steerage Deck Total
0 0 0 0 0 0
Configuration Changes

1876-00-00: Nieuwe stoommachine en ketels van Greenock Foundry Company, Greenock

Certificate of Registry
Ship History Data

Date/Name Ship 1866-09-00 ACHILLES
Manager: Alfred Holt & Co., Liverpool, Great Britain
Owner: Ocean Steam Ship Company Ltd, Liverpool, Great Britain
Shareholder:
Homeport / Flag: Liverpool / Great Britain
Callsign:
Additional info:

Date/Name Ship 1897-00-00 ACHILLES
Manager: Meyer & Co., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Owner: N.V. Nederlandsche Stoomvaart Maatschappij 'Oceaan', Amsterdam, Netherlands
Shareholder:
Homeport / Flag: Amsterdam / Netherlands
Callsign:
Additional info: VOLGENS BRONNEN: NIET GEVAREN ONDER NEDERLANDSE VLAG.

Ship Events Data

1866-00-00: ACHILLES (1) was built in 1866 by Scott & Co. at Greenock with a tonnage of 2,280grt a length of 309ft 6in, a beam of 38ft 10in and a service speed of 10 knots. In December 1866 the Captain was informed by the appointed agent, Bruell & Co., that there was no cargo for the return voyage. However, a newly established company, Butterfied & Swire, stepped in and offered a part cargo of a consignment of shirtings for Lancashire which enabled the ship to make a profitable start to her voyage. Alfred Holt was impressed with Butterfield and Swire's initiative and appointed them as agents in Shanghai. He also recognised that their trade was in textiles and silks in addition to tea. Consequently, the appointment began a valuable and longlasting relationship which had a considerable effect on the fortunes of the Blue Funnel Line. The ships of Alfred Holt started using the Suez Canal very soon after it was opened during November of 1869 and Achilles (1) was the first to use it on her homeward bound voyage. Alfred Holt was determined to obtain the very highest standard for everything even remotely connected to his ships and when machinery in his first ships was installed or replaced between 1876 and 1878, this was not a surprise to anyone as it greatly improved the vessels performance. The great use of the Suez Canal by vessels of the Holt’s fleet was very much in contrast to the attitude of rival P & O whose managers and directors spent many years without making a decision to use it. P&O eventually made its decision, but not until the vessels of Alfred Holt & Co. had established a very firm advantage over their rivals as far as trade was concerned. In 1891 she was transferred to N.S.M. 'Oceaan' without a change of name. She was sold on to Swedish owners in 1896, but even with her re-engining she was obsolete and in the summer of 1899 went for breaking up at Spezia. (John I Bax Collection)

1897-08-17: NRC 170897
Amsterdam, 16 augustus. Het Engelse stooschip ACHILLES, van Batavia herwaarts, zal na aankomst alhier onder Nederlandse vlag gebracht worden.

RN 111298
Amsterdam, 9 december. Naar men verneemt is het stoomschip ACHILLES van de Nederlandsche Stoomvaart Maatschappij ‘Oceaan’ alhier voor GBP 3.850 verkocht.

1898-00-00: Final Fate: Verkocht naar Zweden maar niet in de vaart, in juni 1899 in Genua gesloopt.

Ship Masters Data

Images


Description:
Image type: Photo
Sources